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East Africa Art

Jul 21 '14

africanartagenda:

Alexander “Skunder ” Boghossian

Profile:

Country: Ethiopia

Style: Abstract/ Surrealism Fine Art

Medium: Goat Skin, Oil, Ink, Crayon, Bark

Fun Fact: He got to hang out with the likes  of Leopold Senghor and Aime Cesaire the later Of whom ‘Made  and introduced surealism clearer” to him

Quote: " I was heavly influenced by Cesaire. His imagery, the graphicness [sic] of it, was puncturing. I was a surrealist and he formed for me a stronger vision. He introduced me to more surrealism in poetry. He made me read Edouard and Appolinaire. Cubism became clearer to me in its departure of thought, its ideas and mannerisms. I could feel it, but I did not know how to do it. I did not know how to translate the idea. I had wresteled with this in Ethiopia, with Goudbet."

Paintings:

1. Homage to Abebe Bekila

2. Anathamy of the hunt

3. Crossroads

4. The End of the Beginning

5. Red Snaper

Contact: He. Died in 2003, is represented by http://www.contempafricanart.com/toc_inl.asp

Like him onn facebook; https://www.facebook.com/pages/Skunder-Boghossian/193333204062695?sk=info

Read more about him here; http://www.blengrafix.com/blenmagazine/skunder_jewel.htm

Jul 20 '14
texturesofether:

Alexander Boghossian

texturesofether:

Alexander Boghossian

Jul 19 '14
amultitudeintransportsofjoy:

Skunder…….The end of the beginning, Oil on Canvas, 1972-73
Born in 1937 Skunder Boghossian was one of Ethiopia´s most outstanding artists. After studying in London and Paris, he spent only three years in Ethiopia, in teaching at the Fine Arts School of Addis Abeba, but influenced art there over the last three decades and was followed by several Ethiopian students to Howard University in Washington D.C., where he taught after 1974. His pictures are mainly mystical and religious, made with a variety of techniques and materials, like mixed media, oils, reliefs, brush and ink, and are notable for their rich ornamentation, expressiveness and hallucinatory effect. Influenced by symbolism and surrealism, they have absorbed European and African elements into a new style. Skunder Boghassian died in Washington in 2003.

amultitudeintransportsofjoy:

Skunder…….The end of the beginning, Oil on Canvas, 1972-73

Born in 1937 Skunder Boghossian was one of Ethiopia´s most outstanding artists. After studying in London and Paris, he spent only three years in Ethiopia, in teaching at the Fine Arts School of Addis Abeba, but influenced art there over the last three decades and was followed by several Ethiopian students to Howard University in Washington D.C., where he taught after 1974. His pictures are mainly mystical and religious, made with a variety of techniques and materials, like mixed media, oils, reliefs, brush and ink, and are notable for their rich ornamentation, expressiveness and hallucinatory effect. Influenced by symbolism and surrealism, they have absorbed European and African elements into a new style. Skunder Boghassian died in Washington in 2003.

Jul 18 '14
Intore dance and drumming

Intore dance and drumming

(Source: blog.eafca.org)

Jul 11 '14

africanartagenda:

Felix Magima

Country: Uganda

Style: Semi-Abstract

Medium: Acrylic on Canvas

Fun Fact: Such an art form is also rooted in the caricature and parody of the recent decades, which have seen visual artists struggle with representing their commentary due to a fear of the governments in place.

This voice has come to translate into a very interesting—although sometimes childish-looking—visual language which dominates the batik form, characterized by two-dimensional human figures, animals, and the very stereotypical African village and “African sunset”.

Quote:

“One time I was dating this (Norwegian) girl, and she said that she didn’t want to have children. And I had to ask myself what now? Maybe I need to find a way out of this (relationship)!”

Paintings

1. Fertile Woman

2. Home

3. Divided Temple

4. Nation

5. Waiting at the Door

6.In The Name of God

7. Far From Home

Jul 10 '14

africanartagenda:

Geoffrey Ernest Katantazi Mukasa

Country: Uganda

Style: Contemporary, Cubism

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf
Jul 9 '14

africanartagenda:

Fred Kato Mutebi

Profile

Country: Uganda

Style: Contemporary African Art

Media: Woodcut printing,

Fun Fact: DOn’t buy a painting from him before asking for the motive behind the painting..he does not like that

Quote

Art lovers and art buyers should strive to grasp the artists’ stories. Sometimes we create to activate managers’ or politicians’ minds. The people who view our art are the people who should have the solutions to the problems the artists are addressing.

Paintings 1. Women Activists 2. Urban Madonna 3. New York Subway in winter 4. Abannyunsis

CoNtacT:https://www.facebook.com/FredMutebi

Mutebifred@gmail.com

http://fredmutebi.org/

Using art as a tool to empower people to explore and talk about the challenges facing their communities, Fred set up Let Art Talk, an organisation that helps open up the dialogue on issues such as poverty, child labour and gender by engaging the mainly young people he works with in interpreting the subjects through art. Fred is also aware of the need to involve the elders within the communities, getting them to share their wisdom and experiences, and together work towards affecting positive change. Committed to the success of the organisation fifty percent of the proceeds from a sale of Fred’s artwork goes into the Let Art Talk organisation to help set up a programme, buy materials or fund a trip.

Jul 8 '14
in-kampala:

The drum and dance of the Ugandan National Ballet 

in-kampala:

The drum and dance of the Ugandan National Ballet 

Jul 7 '14

africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga

Country: Uganda

Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract

Medium:

Fun Fact:

Quote:

Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.

Paintings

1. Arrogance

2. Christ at Golgotha

3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)

4.

5.

6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)

7. Mind of His Own

More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/

Jul 6 '14
manufactoriel:

“Effacement” by BEATRICE WANJIKU

manufactoriel:

“Effacement” by BEATRICE WANJIKU

Jul 6 '14
Kitengala Glass glassblowers and arts Isaac and Patrick Kibe from Nairobi making a hut out of recycled glass and found material at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington DC.

Kitengala Glass glassblowers and arts Isaac and Patrick Kibe from Nairobi making a hut out of recycled glass and found material at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington DC.

(Source: instagram.com)

Jul 5 '14
The Ramogi Dancers performing at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington DC. Ramogi is the title of the patriarch of their community. At the climax of their dance in its original presentation and environment, each member is possessed by their patriarch

The Ramogi Dancers performing at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington DC. Ramogi is the title of the patriarch of their community. At the climax of their dance in its original presentation and environment, each member is possessed by their patriarch

(Source: instagram.com)

Jun 28 '14

shadowstookshape:

Cyrus Kabiru (b. 1974, Nairobi, Kenya)
Lives and works in Nairobi, Kenya

African Resources (from the “C-Stunner” series), 2012 
Mixed media (perforated scrap metal, glass beads and plastic bottle caps) Courtesy the artist

Jun 27 '14

africanartagenda:

Patrick Peter Kinuthia

Profile:

Country: Kenya

Style: Potraiture, Fine Art, Contemporary, Realism

Medium: Mostly watercolour, oil on canvas

Fun Fact: If it wasn’t for someone throwing away a Reader’s digest, and Patrick hanging around near garbage he would never have discovered Norman Rockwell who inspired his realist style. Thank you Reader’s Digest, Norman Rockwell, Garbage Dump and random magazine thrower

Quote:

A portrait catches the eye nd the eyes are the windows to the heart

Painting:

1. Hadassah

2.Swahili Girl

3. Turkana Girl

4. First Audition

5.Girl

6. Ngara

7. Samburu girl Africa

8. Motherhood

Contact: http://patrickkinuthia.com

Kinuthiapat@yahoo.com

Kinuthiapat@gmail.com

Info@patrickkinuthia.com

More at: http://faso.com/Kinuthia 

http://www.saatchionline.com/profile/294736 

Jun 25 '14
patrickschierer:

Magdalene Odundo.  ‘Untitled (Cat. 134)’ Vase.

patrickschierer:

Magdalene Odundo.  ‘Untitled (Cat. 134)’ Vase.