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East Africa Art

Aug 21 '14
Aug 20 '14

continentcreative:

Photography by Thandiwe Muriu | Model Anok Kuol | MUA Sinitta Akello

Aug 19 '14

southsud:

Tinney Contemporary Exhibition: The Art of Lost Boys of South Sudan

Nashville, Tennessee - 2008

These works include handcrafted ceramic masks, sculptures, pottery, and paintings (source).

Aug 19 '14
southsud:

The Two Sudans is a collaborative web based film project established in 2013 by a group of young filmmakers from Sudan and Germany. It features a series of short films documenting the lives of people in Sudan and South Sudan following the separation. The official premiere was in Berlin, Germany and in Nairobi, Kenya at the Goethe-Institute in 2013 and can be viewed through the official webpage. The playlist for the Stories of South Sudan series is as follows:
Agel: Basketball Diaries - Part 1-3
Grace - Celebrating the New Nation: Part 1-2
Magot - A Cow Herder’s Life - Part 1-2
Sicilia: Refugee in Your Own Country Part 1-2
Soundtrack of Independence (clip coming soon)

southsud:

The Two Sudans is a collaborative web based film project established in 2013 by a group of young filmmakers from Sudan and Germany. It features a series of short films documenting the lives of people in Sudan and South Sudan following the separation. The official premiere was in Berlin, Germany and in Nairobi, Kenya at the Goethe-Institute in 2013 and can be viewed through the official webpage. The playlist for the Stories of South Sudan series is as follows:

  1. Agel: Basketball Diaries - Part 1-3
  2. Grace - Celebrating the New Nation: Part 1-2
  3. Magot - A Cow Herder’s Life - Part 1-2
  4. Sicilia: Refugee in Your Own Country Part 1-2
  5. Soundtrack of Independence (clip coming soon)
Aug 17 '14
southsud:

Another Nigger Dead by Taban Lo Liyong
Ugandan-born, South Sudanese author Taban Lo Liyong was the first African to graduate with a Masters in creative writing at the University of Iowa in 1968. He has collaborated with the renowned Kenyan author, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, both of whom remain East Africa’s most prolific and influential writers. Liyong has been criticized for distancing himself from South Sudan politically, although following independence he has served the position of Acting Vice Chancellor at the Juba University in South Sudan. Another Nigger Dead is a collection of poems and one of his many publications: including the African Writers Series, a series featuring numerous famed authors such as Chinua Achebe and Ama Ata Aidoo.

southsud:

Another Nigger Dead by Taban Lo Liyong

Ugandan-born, South Sudanese author Taban Lo Liyong was the first African to graduate with a Masters in creative writing at the University of Iowa in 1968. He has collaborated with the renowned Kenyan author, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, both of whom remain East Africa’s most prolific and influential writers. Liyong has been criticized for distancing himself from South Sudan politically, although following independence he has served the position of Acting Vice Chancellor at the Juba University in South Sudan. Another Nigger Dead is a collection of poems and one of his many publications: including the African Writers Series, a series featuring numerous famed authors such as Chinua Achebe and Ama Ata Aidoo.

Aug 16 '14
artafrica:

stool, Kenya

artafrica:

stool, Kenya

Aug 16 '14
artafrica:

Ethiopian Borana Gabra

artafrica:

Ethiopian Borana Gabra

Aug 10 '14
Alindi fabric, Somalia

Alindi fabric, Somalia

Aug 10 '14

Paintings by Yonas Melisa, who graduated from Entotot TVET College with a diploma in graphic arts, shown at the 2014 Addis Art Fair.

Aug 8 '14
Kampala Art Biennale (Uganda, August 2014)

Kampala art biennale is a showcase of contemporary art from Africa with the goal to expose, educate and create debate about the value of art in society. It was established to recognize, and integrate African contemporary art that is being created on the peripherals of mainstream information avenues.
Kampala art biennale was established by Kampala Arts Trust www.kampalaartstrust.org, a collective of visual and performance art practitioners living and working in public and private spaces within the precinct of Kampala city. It was born out of the need for inclusion faced by artists working on the African continent trying to reach the global art scene. Kampala art biennale is afro-centric in nature in that it seeks to promote only artists (foreign or native) working on the African continent by creating a vibrant and visible platform.

Kampala Art Biennale (Uganda, August 2014)

Kampala art biennale is a showcase of contemporary art from Africa with the goal to expose, educate and create debate about the value of art in society. It was established to recognize, and integrate African contemporary art that is being created on the peripherals of mainstream information avenues.

Kampala art biennale was established by Kampala Arts Trust www.kampalaartstrust.org, a collective of visual and performance art practitioners living and working in public and private spaces within the precinct of Kampala city. It was born out of the need for inclusion faced by artists working on the African continent trying to reach the global art scene. Kampala art biennale is afro-centric in nature in that it seeks to promote only artists (foreign or native) working on the African continent by creating a vibrant and visible platform.

Aug 8 '14
Aug 7 '14
theiainteriordesign:

Bracelets from the Nilotic people of the White Nile region, Sudan, 19th C

theiainteriordesign:

Bracelets from the Nilotic people of the White Nile region, Sudan, 19th C

Aug 6 '14

southsud:

Traditional dance of the Mandari people.

The Mundari are an ethnic group of South Sudan. They are located in the state of Central Equatoria. The Mandari people are part of the the Karo people which compose of other Bari speaking ethnic groups such as the BariPojuluKakwaKuku and Nyangwara.

Aug 5 '14
southsud:

Clay cows from a presentation at the Smithsonian Museum by members of the Sudanese Dance and Art program in 2009.

southsud:

Clay cows from a presentation at the Smithsonian Museum by members of the Sudanese Dance and Art program in 2009.

Aug 2 '14
prepaidafrica:

Ethiopia’s emerging art scene pits creativity against profits | Al Jazeera America
Local painters forgo experimentation to cater to growing number of foreign buyers
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Tesfaye Hiwet started visiting his homeland from the U.S. shortly after the 1991 revolution that brought down Ethiopia’s communist-inspired military dictatorship known as the Derg. One reason was to source art for his Washington-based restaurant and nightclub.
After noticing the lack of galleries in the Ethiopian capital, he moved back to Addis Ababa 12 years ago and opened the Makush Art Gallery and Restaurant, starting with a handful of artists. Nowadays, every wall in Makush is blanketed with vivid Ethiopian paintings depicting scenes ranging from monks praying in the dawn half-light to bustling markets and images of wide-eyed, elongated women.
Makush owner Tesfaye Hiwet Makush owner Tesfaye Hiwet relaxing in his office, surrounded by paintings, which make up more than half his business. James Jeffrey Addis Ababa has an active art community that can benefit from the lucrative sales at Makush, which now has about 70 artists on its books and a collection of more than 650 paintings.
But not all the city’s artists want to get involved with Makush because of its unabashed commercial focus — at the sacrifice, they argue, of artistic merit. They worry the gallery represents an unfettered art market where lack of analysis and criticism can compromise artistic integrity, drive runaway prices and lead to the prevalence of mediocre art that doesn’t express the true range of artistic talent simmering away.
“Many artists are increasingly enticed to market-driven productions,” said Elizabeth Giorgis, an art historian and director of the Gebre Kristos Desta Center, a modern art museum in Addis Ababa.
“The current Ethiopian art market has produced a dark side where prices are ineptly assessed and fixed at exorbitant prices that do not warrant the credibility or skills of the artists.”
But an emergent modern and contemporary art scene in energetic flux is a stark contrast from when Ethiopia had no market at all.
“Ethiopia’s growing economy is key,” said Makush art director Nathaniel Yohannes. “Young Ethiopians are opening businesses and buying paintings, and new international organizations are coming to the city.”

prepaidafrica:

Ethiopia’s emerging art scene pits creativity against profits | Al Jazeera America

Local painters forgo experimentation to cater to growing number of foreign buyers

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Tesfaye Hiwet started visiting his homeland from the U.S. shortly after the 1991 revolution that brought down Ethiopia’s communist-inspired military dictatorship known as the Derg. One reason was to source art for his Washington-based restaurant and nightclub.

After noticing the lack of galleries in the Ethiopian capital, he moved back to Addis Ababa 12 years ago and opened the Makush Art Gallery and Restaurant, starting with a handful of artists. Nowadays, every wall in Makush is blanketed with vivid Ethiopian paintings depicting scenes ranging from monks praying in the dawn half-light to bustling markets and images of wide-eyed, elongated women.

Makush owner Tesfaye Hiwet Makush owner Tesfaye Hiwet relaxing in his office, surrounded by paintings, which make up more than half his business. James Jeffrey Addis Ababa has an active art community that can benefit from the lucrative sales at Makush, which now has about 70 artists on its books and a collection of more than 650 paintings.

But not all the city’s artists want to get involved with Makush because of its unabashed commercial focus — at the sacrifice, they argue, of artistic merit. They worry the gallery represents an unfettered art market where lack of analysis and criticism can compromise artistic integrity, drive runaway prices and lead to the prevalence of mediocre art that doesn’t express the true range of artistic talent simmering away.

“Many artists are increasingly enticed to market-driven productions,” said Elizabeth Giorgis, an art historian and director of the Gebre Kristos Desta Center, a modern art museum in Addis Ababa.

“The current Ethiopian art market has produced a dark side where prices are ineptly assessed and fixed at exorbitant prices that do not warrant the credibility or skills of the artists.”

But an emergent modern and contemporary art scene in energetic flux is a stark contrast from when Ethiopia had no market at all.

“Ethiopia’s growing economy is key,” said Makush art director Nathaniel Yohannes. “Young Ethiopians are opening businesses and buying paintings, and new international organizations are coming to the city.”